35 FDA-Approved Prescription Drugs Later Pulled from the Market since the 1970s

According to the FDA, a "drug is removed from the market when its risks outweigh its benefits. A drug is usually taken off the market because of safety issues that cannot be corrected, such as when it is discovered that the drug can cause serious side effects that were not known at the time of approval." The FDA also takes into account the number of people taking a drug being considered for removal so as to not harm those patients. 

  • 1. Accutane (Isotretinoin) on the market for 27 YEARS Use: Acne Manufacturer: Hoffman-La Roche 1982 to June 2009 Cause for recall: increased risk of birth defects, miscarriages, and premature births when used by pregnant women; inflammatory bowel disease; suicidal tendencies. Over 7,000 lawsuits were filed against the manufacturer over the side effects including a $10.5 million verdict and two $9 million verdicts.
  • 2. Baycol (Cerivastatin) on the market for 3 YEARS Use: Cholesterol reduction Manufacturer: Bayer A.G. 1998 to Aug. 2001 Cause for recall: rhabdomyolysis (breakdown of muscle fibers that results in myoglobin being released into the bloodstream) which led to kidney failure; 52 deaths (31 in the US) worldwide; 385 nonfatal cases with most requiring hospitalization; 12 of the deaths were related to taking this drug in combination with gemfibrozil (Lopid)
  • 3. Bextra (Valdecoxib) on the market for 3.3 YEARS Use: NSAID (pain relief) Manufacturer: G.D. Searle & Co. Nov. 20, 2001 to Apr. 7, 2005 Cause for recall: serious cardiovascular adverse events (like death, MI, stroke); increased risk of serious skin reactions (like toxic epidermal necrolysis, Stevens-Johnson syndrome, erythema multiforme); gastrointestinal bleeding. 
  • 4. Cylert (Pemoline) on the market for 30 YEARS Use: Central nervous system stimulant to treat ADHD/ADD Manufacturer: Abbott Laboratories 1975 to Oct. 2010 Cause for recall: liver toxicity. The FDA added a box warning to Cylert in 1999, alerting doctors and patients to the potential of liver damage. Abbott Laboratories, "Cylert," American Journal of Diseases of Children
  • 5. Darvon & Darvocet (Propoxyphene) on the market for 55 YEARS Use: Opioid pain reliever Manufacturer: Xanodyne 1955 to Nov. 19, 2010 Cause for recall: serious toxicity to the heart; between 1981 and 1999 there were over 2,110 deaths reported The UK banned Darvon and Darvocet in 2005. The FDA was petitioned in 1978 and again in 2006 to ban the drug by the group Public Citizen. Christian Sinclair, "Are You Glad Darvocet Got Pulled by the FDA? Are You Sure?," www.pallimed.org, Nov. 30, 2010
  • 6. DBI (Phenformin) on the market for 19 YEARS Use: antidiabetic Manufacturer: Ciba-Geigy 1959 to Nov. 1978 Cause for recall: lactic acidosis (low pH in body tissues and blood and a buildup of lactate) in patients with diabetes
  • 7. DES (Diethylstibestrol) on the market for 31 YEARS Use: synthetic estrogen to prevent miscarriage, premature labor, and other pregnancy complications Manufacturer: Grant Chemical Co. 1940 to 1971 Cause for recall: clear cell adenocarcinoma (cancer of the cervix and vagina), birth defects, and other developmental abnormalities in children born to women who took the drug while pregnant; increased risk of breast cancer, higher risk of death from breast cancer; risk of cancer in children of mothers taking the drug including raised risk of breast cancer after age 40; increased risk of fertility and pregnancy complications, early menopause, testicular abnormalities; potential risks for third generation children (the grandchildren of women who took the drug) but they are unclear as studies are just beginning. Studies in the 1950s showed the drug was not effective at preventing miscarriages, premature labor, or other pregnancy complications. 
  • 8. Duract (Bromfenac) on the market for 1 YEAR Use: Pain killer Manufacturer: Wyeth-Ayerst Laboratories July 1997 to June 26, 1998 Cause for recall: 4 deaths; 8 patients requiring liver transplants; 12 patients with severe liver damage Duract was labeled for maximum use of 10 days but patients often received/took more than 10 days worth of pills; all cases of death and liver damage involved patients taking pills for longer than 10 days.
  • 9. Ergamisol (Levamisole) on the market for 11 YEARS Use: Worm infestation; colon and breast cancers; rheumatoid arthritis Manufacturer: Janssen Pharmaceutica May 8, 1989 to 2000 Cause for recall: neutropenia (a type of low white blood cell count), agranulocytosis (a type of low white blood cell count), and thrombotic vasculopathy (blood clots in blood vessels) which results in retiform purpura (a purple discoloration of the skin that can sometimes require reconstructive surgery) Levamisole is still used to treat animals with worm infestations in the US. It is also being found in street cocaine as an adulterant to increase euphoric qualities.
  • 10. Hismanal (Astemizole) on the market for 11 YEARS Use: Antipsychotic Manufacturer: Janssen Pharmaceutica 1988 to Aug. 13, 1999 Cause for recall: slowed potassium channels in the heart that could cause torsade de pointes (TdP; a heart condition marked by a rotation of the heart's electrical axis) or long QT syndrome (LQTS; prolonged QT intervals)
  • 11. Lotronex (Alosetron) on the market for 0.8 YEAR Use: Irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) in women Manufacturer: Prometheus Laboratories, Inc. Feb. 9, 2000 to Nov. 28, 2000 Cause for recall: 49 cases of ischemic colitis (inflammation and injury of the large intestine); 21 cases of severe constipation (10 requiring surgery); 5 deaths; mesenteric ischemia (inflammation and injury of the small intestine) Lotronex was reintroduced to the US market in 2002 with restricted indication. Irritable Bowel Syndrome Self Help and Support Group, "Lotronex," www.ibsgroups.org (accessed Jan. 6, 2014)
  •  12. Meridia (Sibutramine) on the market for 13 YEARS Use: Appetite Suppressant Manufacturer: Knoll Pharmaceuticals Nov. 1997 to Oct. 2010 Cause for recall: increased cardiovascular and stroke risk FDA reviewer Dr. David Graham listed Meridia with Crestor, Accutane, Bextra, and Serevent as drugs whose sales should be limited or stopped because of their danger to consumers in Sep. 30, 2004 testimony before a Senate committee, calling the drugs "another Vioxx."
  • 13. Merital & Alival (Nomifensine) on the market for 3 YEARS Use: Antidepressant Manufacturer: Hoechst AG (now Sanofi-Aventis) 1982 to 1985 Cause for recall: haemolytic anemia; some deaths due to immunohemolytic anemia
  • 14. Micturin (Terodiline) on the market for 2 YEARS Use: Bladder incontinence Manufacturer: Forest Labs Aug. 1989 to Sep. 13, 1991 Cause for recall: QT prolongation and potential for cardiotoxicity
  • 15. Mylotarg (Gemtuzumab Ozogamicin) on the market for 10 YEARS Use: Acute myeloid leukemia (AML, a bone marrow cancer) Manufacturer: Wyeth May 2000 to June 21, 2010 Cause for recall: increased risk of death and veno-occlusive disease (obstruction of veins)
  • 16. Omniflox (Temafloxacin) on the market for 0.3 YEAR Use: Antibiotic for pneumonia, bronchitis, and other respiratory tract infections; prostatitis and other genitourinary tract infections; skin ailments. Manufacturer: Abbot Laboratories Jan. 31, 1992 to June 5, 1992 Cause for recall: 3 deaths; severe low blood sugar; hemolytic anemia and other blood cell abnormalities; kidney disfunction (half of the cases required renal dialysis); allergic reactions including some causing life-threatening respiratory distress
  • 17. Palladone (Hydromorphone hydrochloride, extended-release) on the market for 0.5 YEAR Use: Narcotic painkiller Manufacturer: Purdue Pharma Jan. 2005 to July 13, 2005 Cause for recall: high levels of palladone could slow or stop breathing, or cause coma or death; combining the drug with alcohol use could lead to rapid release of hydromorphone, in turn leading to potentially fatally high levels of drugs in the system
  • 18. Permax (Pergolide) on the market for 19 YEARS Use: Parkinson's disease Manufacturer: Valeant 1988 to Mar. 29, 2007 Cause for recall: valve regurgitation (a condition that causes the valves to not close tightly, which allows blood to flow backward over the valve) in the mitral, tricuspid, and aortic heart valves, which can result in shortness of breath, fatigue, and heart palpitations Permax is still available in the U.S. for veterinary use, specifically for pituitary pars intermedia hyperplasia or equine Cushing's Syndrome (ECS) in horses.
  • 19. Pondimin (Fenfluramine) on the market for 24 YEARS Use: Appetite suppressant Manufacturer: Wyeth-Ayerst 1973 to Sep. 15, 1997 Cause for recall: 30% of patients prescribed the drug had abnormal echocardiograms; 33 cases of rare valvular disease in women; 66 additional reports of heart valve disease Pondimin is better known as "Fen-Phen" when prescribed with Phentermine.
  • 20. Posicor (Mibefradil) on the market for 1 YEAR Use: Calcium channel blocker (used to treat hypertension) Manufacturer: Roche Laboratories June 1997 to June 1998 Cause for recall: fatal interactions with at least 25 other drugs (ex: common antibiotics, antihistamines, and cancer drugs) including astemizole, cisapride, terfenadine, lovastatin, and simvastatin Posicor was found by the FDA to offer no significant benefit over other anti-hypertensive or antianginal drugs, which made the risks of drug interactions "unreasonable." Patients immediately switching from Posicor to another calcium channel blocker were at increased risk of going into shock within 12 hours of the drug switch.
  • 21. Propulsid (Cisapride) on the market for 7 YEARS Use: Severe nighttime heartburn associated with gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) Manufacturer: Janssen Pharmaceutica 1993 to July 14, 2000 Cause for recall: more than 270 cases of serious cardiac arrythmias (including ventricular tachycardia, ventricular fibrillation, torsades de pointes, and QT prolongation) reported between July 1993 and May 1999, with 70 being deaths. It is still available for use in animals in the US and Canada.
  • 22. PTZ & Metrazol (Pentylenetetrazol) on the market for 48 YEARS Use: Convulsive therapy for schizophrenia and other psychiatric conditions Manufacturer: not known 1934 to 1982 Cause for recall: uncontrollable seizures; pulled muscles; fractured bones; spine fractures in as many as 42% of patients
  • 23. Quaalude [Marketed as: Optimal, Sopor, Parest, Somnafac, and Bi-Phetamine T] (Methaqualone) on the market for 23 YEARS Use: Sedative and hypnotic Manufacturer: William H. Rorer Inc. & Lemmon Company 1962 to 1985 Cause for recall: mania; seizures; vomiting; convulsions; death. Methaqualone was originally tested in India as a malaria treatment (it was ineffective). The drug is now a schedule 1 drug in the United States (like heroin, marijuana, and LSD). Res Obscura, "From Quacks to Quaaludes: Three Centuries of Drug Advertising," www.resobscura.blogspot.nl, June 11, 2012
  • 24. Raplon (Rapacuronium) on the market for 2 YEARS Use: Non-polarizing neuromuscular blocker (used in anesthesia Manufacturer: Organon Inc. 1999 to Mar. 27, 2001 Cause for recall: bronchospasms and unexplained deaths
  • 25. Raptiva (Efalizumab) on the market for 6 YEARS Use: Psoriasis Manufacturer: Genentech 2003 to Apr. 8, 2009 (completely withdrawn by June 8, 2009) Cause for recall: progressive multifocal leukoencephalopathy (PML; a rare and usually fatal disease that causes inflammation or progressive damage of the white matter in multiple locations of the brain)
  • 26. Raxar (Grepafloxacin) on the market for 2 YEARS Use: Antibiotic for bacterial infections Manufacturer: Glaxo Wellcome 1997 to Nov. 1, 1999 Cause for recall: cardiac repolarization; QT interval prolongation; ventricular arrhythmia (torsade de pointes)
  • 27. Redux (Dexfenfluramine) on the market for 1YEAR Use: Appetite suppressant Manufacturer: Wyeth-Ayerst 1996 to Sep. 15, 1997 Cause for recall: 30% of patients prescribed the drug had abnormal echocardiograms; 33 cases of rare valvular disease in women; 66 additional reports of heart valve disease. Redux is better known as "Fen-Phen" when prescribed with Phentermine.
  • 28. Rezulin (Troglitazone) on the market for 3.25 YEARS Use: Antidiabetic and anti-inflammatory Manufacturer: Parke-Davis/Warner Lambert (now Pfizer) Jan. 29, 1997 to Mar. 21, 2000 Cause for recall: at least 90 liver failures; at least 63 deaths. About 35.000 personal injury claims were filed against the manufacturer (Pfizer).
  • 29. Selacryn (Tienilic acid) on the market for 3 YEARS Use: blood pressure Manufacturer: SmithKline May 2, 1979 to 1982 Cause for recall: hepatitis; 36 deaths; at least 500 cases of severe liver and kidney damage. Anphar Labs (which developed the drug in France and sold rights to sell in US to SmithKline) sent a report to SmithKline in Apr. 1979 (translated in May 1979 to English from French) stating Selacryn damaged livers. On Dec. 13, 1984, SmithKline Beckman plead guilty to "14 counts of failing to file reports with the drug agency of adverse reactions to Selacryn and 20 counts of falsely labeling the drug with a statement that there was no known cause-and-effect relationship between Selacryn and liver damage"
  •  30. Seldane (Terfenadine) on the market for 13 YEARS Use: Antihistamine Manufacturer: Hoechst Marion Roussel (now Sanofi-Aventis) 1985 to Feb. 1, 1998 Cause for recall: life-threatening heart problems when taken in combination with other drugs (specifically erthromycin (an antibiotic) and ketoconazole (an antifungal). Seldane was not considered an imminent threat, the FDA pulled Seldane from the market because Allegra and Allegra D were produced by the same company and were deemed safer by the FDA.
  • 31. Trasylol (Aprotinin) on the market for 15 (48) YEARS Use: antifibrinolytic to reduce blood loss during surgery Manufacturer: Bayer 1993 (but used since the 1960s) to Nov. 5, 2007 (marketing suspension request to phase it out of the market); May 14, 2008 (manufacturer announced complete removal from market) Cause for recall: increased chance of death, serious kidney damage, congestive heart failure, and strokes. On Feb. 8, 2006, the FDA issued a public heath advisory to surgeons who perform heart bypasses, alerting them of possible fatal side effects.
  • 32. Vioxx (Rofecoxib) on the market for 5.3 YEARS Use: NSAID (pain relief) Manufacturer: Merck May 20, 1999 to Sep. 30, 2004 Cause for recall: increased risk of heart attack and stroke; linked to about 27,785 heart attacks or sudden cardiac deaths between May 20, 1999 and 2003 Ads for Vioxx features Olympic gold medalists Dorothy Hamill and Bruce Jenner. Vioxx was prescribed to more than 20 million people, and was estimated to be the direct cause of about 60,000 early deaths before it was officials pulled from market.
  • 33. Xigris (Drotrecogin alfa (activated)) on the market for 10 YEARS Use: Severe sepsis and septic shock Manufacturer: Eli Lilly & Company Nov. 2001 to Oct. 25, 2011 Cause for recall: no survival benefit
  •  34. Zelmid (Zimelidine) on the market for 0 YEARS Use: Anti-depressant Manufacturer: Astra AB (now AstraZeneca) 1982 to 1982 (withdrawn by the FDA before being released in the US market) Cause for recall: Guillain–Barré syndrome; higher risk of suicide
  •  35. Zelnorm (Tegaserod maleate) on the market for 4.6 YEARS Use: irritable bowel syndrome with constipation (IBS-C) and chronic idiopathic constipation (CIC) in women younger than 55 Manufacturer: Novartis July 24, 2002 to Mar. 30, 2007 Cause for recall: higher chance of heart attack, stroke, and unstable angina (heart/chest pain) The FDA permitted restricted use of Zelnorm on an emergency basis (with prior case-by-case authorization from the FDA) on July 27, 2007.

Below are another 133 Drug products - not listed above - that had FDA approval, or an application in process, and were, for some reason or another, discontinued or otherwise pulled from the marketplace.  No specific reason given for the drug being pulled, or necessarily what happened to the company after all the money they spent on R&D, field studies, clinical studies, and governmental hoop jumping. 

(Listed in alphabetical order)

  • Alatrofloxacin – 2006 – worldwide – liver toxicity, leading to liver transplant and death
  • Amineptine (Survector) - 1999 - France, US - Hepatotoxicity, dermatological side effects, and abuse potential.
  • Aprotinin (Trasylol) 2008 US Increased risk of death.
  • Ardeparin (Normiflo) 2001 US Not for reasons of safety or efficacy.
  • Astemizole (Hismanal) 1999 US, Malaysia, Multiple Nonspecified Markets Fatal arrhythmial
  • Azaribine 1976 US Thromboembolism.
  • Benoxaprofen 1982 Germany, Spain, UK, US Liver and kidney failure; gastrointestinal bleeding; ulcers.
  • Bithionol 1967 US Dermatologic toxicity.
  • Bromfenac 1998 US Severe hepatitis and liver failure (some requiring transplantation).
  • Butamben (Efocaine)(Butoforme) 1964 US Dermatologic toxicity; psychiatric Reactions.
  • Cerivastatin (Baycol, Lipobay) 2001 US Risk of rhabdomyolysis
  • Chlormadinone (Chlormenadione) 1970 UK, US Animal Carcinogenicity.
  • Chlormezanone (Trancopal) 1996 European Union, US, South Africa, Japan Hepatotoxicity & Steven-Johnson Syndrome
  • Cisapride (Propulsid) 2000 US Risk of fatal cardiac arrhythmias
  • Clioquinol 1973 France, Germany, UK, US Neurotoxicity.
  • Cylert (Pemoline) on the market for 30 YEARS
  • Dantron 1963 Canada, UK, US Mutagenic.[13] withdrawn from general use in UK but permitted in terminal patients
  • Dexfenfluramine 1997 European Union, UK, US Cardiotoxic
  • Dihydrostreptomycin 1970 US Neuropsychiatric reaction.
  • Dilevalol 1990 UK Hepatotoxicity.
  • Dimazole (Diamthazole) 1972 France, US Neuropsychiatric reaction.
  • Dimethylamylamine (DMAA) 1983 US Voluntarily withdrawn from market by Lily.[15]:12 Reintroduced as a dietary supplement in 2006;[15]:13 and in 2013 the FDA started work to ban it due to cardiovascular problems
  • Dinoprostone 1990 UK Uterine hypotonus, fetal distress.
  • Dipyrone (Metamizole) 1975 UK, US, Others Agranulocytosis, anaphylactic reactions.
  • Dithiazanine iodide 1964 France, US Cardiovascular and metabolic reaction.
  • Dofetilide 2004 Germany Drug interactions, prolonged QT.
  • Drotrecogin alfa (Xigris) 2011 Worldwide Lack of efficacy as shown by PROWESS-SHOCK study
  • Ebrotidine 1998 Spain Hepatotoxicity.
  • Efalizumab (Raptiva) 2009 Germany Withdrawn because of increased risk of progressive multifocal leukoencephalopathy
  • Encainide 1991 UK, US Ventricular arrhythmias.
  • Ethyl carbamate 1963 Canada, UK, US, Carcinogenicity.
  • Etretinate 1989 France Withdrawn US (1999). Risk for birth defects.
  • Exifone 1989 France Hepatotoxicity.
  • Fen-phen (popular combination of fenfluramine and phentermine) 1997 Cardiotoxicity
  • Fenclofenac 1984 UK Cutaneous reactions; animal carcinogenicity.
  • Fenclozic acid 1970 UK, US Hepatotoxicity.
  • Fenfluramine 1997 European Union, UK, US, India, South Africa, others Cardiac valvular disease, pulmonary hypertension, cardiac fibrosis.
  • Fenoterol 1990 New Zealand Asthma mortality.
  • Feprazone 1984 Germany, UK Cutaneous reaction, multiorgan toxicity.
  • Fipexide 1991 France Hepatotoxicity.
  • Flosequinan (Manoplax) 1993 UK, US Increased mortality at higher doses; increased hospitalizations.
  • Flunitrazepam 1991 France Abuse.
  • Gatifloxacin 2006 US Increased risk of dysglycemia.
  • Gemtuzumab ozogamicin (Mylotarg) 2010 US No improvement in clinical benefit; risk for death.
  • Glafenine 1984 France, Germany Anaphylaxis.
  • Grepafloxacin (Raxar) 1999 Withdrawn Germany, UK, US others Cardiac repolarization; QT interval prolongation.
  • Ibufenac 1968 UK Hepatotoxicity, jaundice.
  • Indalpine 1985 France Agranulocytosis.
  • Indoprofen 1983 Germany, Spain, UK Animal carcinogenicity, gastrointestinal toxicity
  • Iodinated casein strophantin 1964 US Metabolic reaction.
  • Iproniazid 1964 Canada Interactions with food products containing tyrosine.
  • Isaxonine phosphate 1984 France Hepatotoxicity.
  • Isoxicam 1983 France, Germany, Spain, others Stevens johnson syndrome.
  • Kava Kava 2002 Germany Hepatotoxicity.
  • Ketorolac 1993 France, Germany, others Hemorrhage, renal Failure.
  • L-tryptophan 1989 Germany, UK Eosinophilic myalgia syndrome. Still sold in the US
  • Levamisole (Ergamisol) 1999 US Still used as veterinary drug and as a human antihelminthic in many markets; listed on the WHO List of Essential Medicines. In humans, it was used to treat melanoma before it was withdrawn for agranulocytosis.
  • Levomethadyl acetate 2003 US Cardiac arrhythmias and cardiac arrest.
  • Lumiracoxib (Prexige) 2007–2008 Worldwide Liver damage
  • Lysergic acid diethylamide (LSD) 1950s–1960s Marketed as a psychiatric drug; withdrawn after it became widely used recreationally. Now illegal in most of the world.
  • Mebanazine 1975 UK Hepatotoxicity, drug intereaction.
  • Methandrostenolone 1982 France, Germany, UK, US, others Off-label abuse.
  • Methapyrilene 1979 Germany, UK, US Animal carcinogenicity.
  • Methaqualone 1984 South Africa (1971), India (1984), United Nations (1971–1988) Withdrawn because of risk of addiction and overdose
  • Metipranolol 1990 UK, others Uveitis.
  • Metofoline 1965 US Unspecific experimental toxicity.
  • Mibefradil 1998 European Union, Malaysia, US, others Fatal arrhythmia, drug interactions.
  • Minaprine 1996 France Convulsions.
  • Moxisylyte 1993 France Necrotic hepatitis.
  • Muzolimine 1987 France, Germany, European Union Polyneuropathy.
  • Natalizumab (Tysabri) 2005–2006 US Voluntarily withdrawn from US market because of risk of Progressive multifocal leukoencephalopathy (PML). Returned to market July, 2006.
  • Nefazodone 2007 US, Canada, others Branded version withdrawn by originator in several countries in 2007 for hepatotoxicity. Generic versions available.
  • Nialamide 1974 UK, US Hepatotoxicity, drug intereaction.
  • Nikethamide 1988 multiple markets CNS Stimulation.
  • Nitrefazole 1984 Germany Hepatic and hematologic toxicity.
  • Nomifensine 1981–1986 France, Germany, Spain, UK, US, others Hemolytic Anemia, hepatotoxicity, serious hypersensitive reactions.
  • Oxeladin 1976 Canada, UK, US (1976) Carcinogenicity.
  • Oxyphenbutazone 1984–1985 UK, US, Germany, France, Canada Bone marrow suppression, Stevens–Johnson syndrome.
  • Oxyphenisatin (Phenisatin) Australia, France, Germany, UK, US Hepatotoxicity.
  • Ozogamicin 2010 US No improvement in clinical benefit; risk for death; veno-occlusive disease.
  • Pemoline (Cylert) 1997 Canada, UK Withdrawn from US in 2005. Hepatotoxicity Reason:hepatotoxicity.
  • Pentobarbital 1980 Norway Risk of fatal overdose
  • Pentylenetetrazol 1982 Withdrawn for inability to produce effective convulsive therapy, and for causing seizures.
  • Pergolide (Permax) 2007 US Risk for heart valve damage.
  • Perhexilene 1985 UK, Spain Neurologic and hepatic toxicity.
  • Phenacetin 1975 Canada An ingredient in "A.P.C." tablet; withdrawn because of risk of cancer and kidney disease[33] Germany Denmark, UK, US, others Reason: nephropathy.
  • Phenformin and Buformin 1977 France, Germany US Severe lactic acidosis
  • Phenolphthalein 1997 US Carcinogenicity.
  • Phenoxypropazine 1966 UK Hepatotoxicity, drug intereaction.
  • Phenylbutazone 1985 Germany Off-label abuse, hematologic toxicity.
  • Phenylpropanolamine(Propagest, Dexatrim) 2000 Canada, US Hemorrhagic stroke.
  • Pifoxime (=Pixifenide) 1976 France Neuropsychiatric reaction.
  • Pirprofen 1990 France, Germany, Spain Liver toxicity.
  • Prenylamine 1988 Canada, France, Germany, UK, US, others Cardiac arrythmia[37] and death.
  • Rapacuronium (Raplon) 2001 US, multiple markets Withdrawn in many countries because of risk of fatal bronchospasm
  • Remoxipride 1993 UK, others Aplastic anemia.
  • Rimonabant (Acomplia) 2008 Worldwide Risk of severe depression and suicide
  • Rofecoxib (Vioxx) 2004 Worldwide Withdrawn by Merck & Co. Risk of myocardial infarction and stroke
  • Rosiglitazone (Avandia) 2010 Europe Risk of heart attacks and death. This drug continues to be available in the US
  • Secobarbital France, Norway, others. Risk of overdose
  • Sertindole 1998 European Union Arrhythmia and sudden cardiac death
  • Sibutramine (Reductil/Meridia) 2010 Australia, Canada, China, the European Union (EU), Hong Kong, India, Mexico, New Zealand, the Philippines, Thailand, the United Kingdom, and the United States Increased risk of heart attack and stroke.
  • Sparfloxacin 2001 US QT prolongation and phototoxicity.
  • Sulfacarbamide 1988 Germany Dermatologic, hematologic and hepatic reactions.
  • Sulfamethoxydiazine 1988 Germany Unknown.
  • Sulfamethoxypyridazine 1986 UK Dermatologic and hematologic reactions.
  • Suloctidyl 1985 Germany, France, Spain Hepatotoxicity.
  • Suprofen 1986–1987 UK, Spain, US Kidney damage.
  • Tegaserod (Zelnorm) 2007 US Risk for heart attack, stroke, and unstable angina.[2] Was available through a restricted access program until April 2008.
  • Temafloxacin 1992 Germany, UK, US, others Low blood sugar; hemolytic anemia; kidney, liver dysfunction; allergic reactions
  • Temazepam (Restoril, Euhypnos, Normison, Remestan, Tenox, Norkotral) 1999 Sweden, Norway Diversion, abuse, and a relatively high rate of overdose deaths in comparison to other drugs of its group. This drug continues to be available in most of the world including the US, but under strict controls. 
  • Terfenadine (Seldane, Triludan) 1997–1998 France, South Africa, Oman, others, US Prolonged QT interval; ventricular tachycardia
  • Terodiline (Micturin) 1991 Germany, UK, Spain, others Prolonged QT interval, ventricular tachycardia and arrhythmia.
  • Tetrazepam 2013 European Union Serious cutaneous reactions.
  • Thalidomide 1961 Germany Withdrawn because of risk of teratogenicity;[52] returned to market for use in leprosy and multiple myeloma under FDA orphan drug rules
  • Thenalidine 1960 Canada, UK, US Neutropenia
  • Thiobutabarbitone 1993 Germany Renal insufficiency.
  • Thioridazine (Melleril) 2005 Germany, UK Withdrawn worldwide due to severe cardiac arrhythmias
  • Ticrynafen (Tienilic acid) 1980 Germany, France, UK, US others Liver toxicity and death.
  • Tolcapone (Tasmar) 1998 European Union, Canada, Australia Hepatotoxicity
  • Tolrestat (Alredase) 1996 Argentina, Canada, Italy, others Severe hepatotoxicity
  • Triacetyldiphenolisatin 1971 Australia Hepatotoxicity.
  • Triazolam 1991 France, Netherlands, Finland, Argentina, UK others Psychiatric adverse drug reactions, amnesia.
  • Triparanol 1962 France, US Cataracts, alopecia, ichthyosis.
  • Troglitazone (Rezulin) 2000 US, Germany Hepatotoxicity
  • Trovafloxacin (Trovan) 1999–2001 European Union, US Withdrawn because of risk of liver failure
  • Valdecoxib (Bextra) 2004 US Risk of heart attack and stroke.
  • Vincamine 1987 Germany Hematologic toxicity.
  • Xenazoic acid 1965 France Hepatotoxicity.
  • Ximelagatran (Exanta) 2006 Germany Hepatotoxicity
  • Zimelidine 1983 Worldwide Risk of Guillain–Barré syndrome, hypersensitivity reaction, hepatotoxicity, banned worldwide.
  • Zomepirac 1983 UK, Germany, Spain, US Anaphylactic reactions and non-fatal allergic reactions, renal failure

All information in this article is for educational purposes only. Nothing herein is for the diagnosis, treatment, prescription, or cure of any disease or health condition. If you have medical concerns, please see a real licensed doctor, who can actually see you... run any necessary tests, and focus on your specific needs, symptom(s), and unique situation. 

© Copyright 2018, Terry Mercer - All Rights Reserved